Courses

  • ME 313: Manufacturing Processes

  • This is a 7 week course taught two times a semester. It describes fundamentals of plastics manufacturing processes in a series of 14 lectures and 6 laboratories. For this course Osswald wrote the textbook Polymer Processing Fundamentals, Hanser Publishers, (1997). The textbook has been adopted at various universities around the world.

  • ME 314: Manufacturing Fundamentals

  • An introduction to fundamental tools needed for the understanding and optimization of manufacturing processes. Modeling tools such as dimensional analysis, scaling and transport phenomena are presented as well as the role of manufacturing automation and systems, through lectures and laboratories. Engineering economy is also addressed in this course. This course is a required course in the mechanical engineering curriculum.

  • ME 417: Introduction to Polymer Processing

  • Description of the physical, thermal, mechanical, and rheological properties of polymeric materials relevant to their processing behavior. Review of the basic transport phenomena equations: mass, momentum, and energy. Analysis of various processing operations for the manufacture of polymeric articles, with particular emphasis on: extrusion, injection molding, blow molding, thermoforming, and compression molding. Discussion of plastics recycling issues.

  • ME 418: Engineering Design with Polymers

  • This course is intended to acquaint the student with a polymers' unique behavior and its relation to design. Molecular structure and basic properties are discussed. The relation between processing and properties of the final part are covered, as are mixing, anisotropy, and residual stresses during solidification. Important properties and the behavior of the polymer component are discussed: mechanical behavior, failure, optical properties, permeability, and electrical properties. For this course Osswald wrote the textbook Materials Science of Polymers for Engineers, Hanser Publishers, (1996), 2nd Ed. (2003). The textbook has been adopted at various universities around the world.The book was translated into Japanese and Korean.

  • ME 419: Fundamentals of Injection Molding

  • Injection molding is one of the most versatile and important operations for mass production of complex plastic parts with excellent dimensional tolerance. Among all the polymer-processing methods, injection molding accounts for 32% by weight of all the polymeric material processed. This course covers all the major aspects of injection molding as outlined below, with emphases on design, processing, process physics, computer-aided engineering (CAE), troubleshooting, and advanced molding processes. Lectures also include video tapes, case studies, field trip, independent research project with presentation, and hands-on sessions of using CAE tools to provide students with "real-world" experiences and help them develop logical thinking, analyzing and problem-solving skills.

  • ME 420: Introduction to Composites Processing

  • This course covers the basic principles of composite materials and processes. An historical overview and trends of composites in industry is presented first, followed with an introduction to mechanics of composites. The most important processes are presented along with an introduction to transport phenomena in composites processing, covering heat transfer during cure and flow through porous media. As a class project a canoe will be manufactured using vacuum resin infusion with the goal of establishing a process that is reproducible, robust, and quality assured.

  • ME 514: Additive Manufacturing

  • Rapidly advancing additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, often also called 3D printing, provide us a direct way of converting digital data into physical objects. This novel manufacturing technology enables the building of parts that have traditionally been impossible to fabricate because of their complex shapes. In the past few years, advances in material, process, and machine development have enabled AM processes to evolve from the prototyping stage to direct product manufacturing. Such rapid manufacturing (RM) capabilities will revolutionize industries such as aerospace, defense, biomedical, and jewelry to name a few. Understanding the advantages and limitations of AM technologies is important for future engineers in developing new engineering systems and identifying emerging opportunities in developing products for mass customization. Since AM technologies are evolving almost daily, this course gives an overview of the different technologies existing today and aims to provide tools and knowledge to evaluate new developments in this area.

  • ME 717: Advanced Polymer Processing

  • Advanced analysis and modeling of plastics extrusion, injection molding, and other processes; mold and equipment design; materials consideration.

  • ME 718: Modeling and Simulation in Polymer Processing

  • This course is designed to acquaint the student with computer simulation technology This course is designed to acquaint the student with computer simulation technology used for the engineering of polymer processes, such as compression molding, injection molding, extrusion, blow molding, and many others. The course reviews the basic equations of state, presents flow and heat transfer models used in polymer processing, and illustrates their numerical implementation using finite differences, finite elements, and boundary integral methods. The various numerical techniques are subsequently used to solve problems dealing with fluid flow, heat transfer, and structural development in polymer processing operations. For this course Osswald wrote the Textbook Polymer Processing - Modeling and Simulation, Hanser Publishers, (2006). Part III of this book will be used in this course.